To that end, the Party Central Committee issued Resolution No 52 on proactively joining the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which has greatly bolstered Vietnam’s digital transformation.

Vietnam kicked off its digital transformation process in the middle of 2020, with a specialised programme towards 2025 and vision to 2030 approved by Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc. It was introduced to specify the guidelines set out in Resolution No 52 by the Politburo on Vietnam joining the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The national programme was then followed by a framework on digital transformation from the Ministry of Information and Communications. Nearly 30 ministries, agencies, and localities have since devised their own plans for digital transformation.

 

Indeed, e-government has been aggressively implemented around the country. The national portal for public services has saved enterprises considerable time and cost. A national reporting platform has also been introduced to enhance the Government’s management and governance works.

As COVID-19 forced people to stay at home, many gradually acquired the habit of going digital. The trend created a golden opportunity for local enterprises to develop state-of-art tech products.

Digital transformation takes time and continual reflection and therefore requires indexes and standards to assess if organisations are on track with the digitalisation process. Such indexes have been introduced recently by the Ministry of Information and Communications, expressing the government’s determination in digital transformation.

Since its introduction in September 2019, Resolution No 52 has greatly facilitated Vietnam’s innovation and digital transformation process. Still, experts suggest more aggressive action be taken by the Government so that the legal framework is completed shortly, which would become a driving force for national digital transformation./.VNA